Why SOPA & PIPA are Creepy: The Best Video Explanation in Plain English

Here is an excellent explanation of SOPA and PIPA and what the implications are:

Talk is by Sal Khan, Founder of Khan Academy (@KhanAcademy), one of the largest free educational online institutions.

These cards were passed out during the SOPA rally in San Francisco at the Civic Center on Wednesday, January 18, 2012

 

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The SOPA Fuss: Why the Old Guard is Losing (Relevancy)

Yesterday, history was made. An unprecedented number of ordinary citizens called their Congressional offices to voice their opposition for the anti-piracy bill SOPA. The formidable old guard in Washington was forced to listen as Internet giants backed by activist citizens mobilized across the country through Web blackouts and continuous criticism. The message was clear and lessons were learned. By creating a grass roots community to “Stop SOPA”, ordinary people conveyed the message that people are the innovators capable of making important change. Washington learned that the Internet matters. Citizens were refusing to give them permission to break it. Perhaps the old guard needed to be reminded again what space in time they stood in. Welcome to the New Economy. Hello?

Jonathan Nelson, organizer of the San Francisco/Silicon Valley SOPA rally (and Chris McCann, co-founder of Startup Digest behind him with the big smile)

A substantial number of people convened at the Civic Center in San Francisco for the local SOPA rally organized by Jonathan Nelson, founder of Hackers and Founders. He lined up a group of effective speakers: founders of technology companies, a high-profile Silicon Valley investor, local politician, celebrity, start-up attorney…. It was a group of relevant individuals contributing their thoughts about the historical matter.

MC Hammer: “We need to inform and educate. Government cannot shut down sites with undue process. It’s barbaric.”

The key takeaway from this rally and the national effort was that SOPA is not about creating a deeper divide between government and the people. It’s about reducing the tension, creating a bridge and finding a solution together. Jonathan Nelson and Ron Conway perhaps summed it up best. Mr. Nelson had simply and profoundly stated “We need to educate our legislators.” The intent of SOPA is good. Piracy is bad. But the law is too broadly written by people who are not equipped with the right knowledge and expertise in the (technology) field.

Ron Conway had proposed, “Find a way to innovate a solution. Put together a committee of technologists to solve a problem with technology.” There is no simple solution for a complex matter which involves the Internet, Constitutional rights and the human population. But the relevant discussion should center on educating the lawmakers. How can a law centered on a revolutionary entity called the Internet be effective and do good if it is written by people who are not in the industry? Could it make sense to get the brightest minds in technology who are embedded in the culture – who live, breath and understand the culture, to help come up with a solution for this complex matter?

Ron Conway, high-profile Silicon Valley investor

As we recently observed Martin Luther King Day and as the one year anniversary of the Arab Spring unfolds, we are witnessing a digital community of ordinary citizens mobilizing to stop unfairness. From SOPA to the NDAA, global citizens are trying to create more awareness about social and humanitarian injustices. There is a collective consciousness at work.

These influential citizens of the digital age are the New Establishment. They are the relevant voices. The old guard in Washington and old media are becoming less relevant. Ordinary people are now able to do extraordinary things. They are able to make an impact on society. Hello, extraordinary you. What are you planning to do today to ignite discussion? What are you doing to stay relevant?